Architecture

Mar 022015
 

Today’s doors are mass produced and available in several panel styles.  Why not make a design statement and transform ordinary doors into elegant architectural elements.  Here are some amazing doors to inspire you.  From carved wood custom designs to embellishing doors with ornament and/or paint.  Grab a cup of coffee and enjoy.

carved wood doors

Love this single panel design that matches the narrow panels.  Common elements to achieving this look are several moldings, corner ornaments and a central feature.  This design is more difficult because of the curve, but a simpler version can be achieved with Beaux-Artes panel kits such as the one shown below the inspiration picture.

doors with ornament

Georgian Panel kit comes with 4 corners and 16′ of panel molding for $199.  They are available in 20 finishes so all you have to do is use adhesive caulk to install it.  Use it alone or in conjunction with other moldings, ornament and paint.  Here it is shown as a wall panel with our damask canvas panel.

Beaux-Artes Georgian Wall Panel kit

 

 

Wonderful  header and beautiful trim for this door in Holkham Hall, Norfolk, UK

Door header and trim

Adding a header makes a huge impact.

door header with ornament

door header side view

 

Hall of War in Pavlosk Palace.  Effective use of large ornament.

heavy ornament

This is carved wood, but this allover pattern can be done with ornament or a painted design.

carved wood

details of carved wood design

carved wood door

paneled doors

 

gold ornament with white background

3-panel door design

Versailles Door

Versailles door

Versailles

Versailles ornament

panels with trim and decorative header

Chateau Amon Re, Belgium

2-panels with ornament

Apsley House

Asymmetrical panel design

panels with ornament

panel ornament closeup

 

Egg and Dart is a great choice for the panel molding.  Beautiful ornament for the center panel.  See Decorators Supply ornament below.

 

closeup of ornament

Decorators Supply Composition Ornament #9884 11-1/5″ x 24-3/4″ $324.74decorators supply ornament

ornament and panels

Doors with artistry are saved.  There is a strong market for  using these beautiful works of art.

painted panels

Entrance Doors with Style.

Glass door with ornament

paint and ornament

glass and ornament

entrance door

St. Frances of Assisi Church

2015-door-of-st.francis-assissi-church

Pink House wood entrance door

entrance door

ornament and panel design

Painted Door Designs

Beautiful painted design on this curved door.  The headboard is also amazing.

painted design curved door

painted doors

painted panel designs

painted panel designs

painted door design

Simple gold bead looks fabulous.

door panels design

Italian Chinoserie

Chinese Italian design

Simple and elegant.

painted door panel design

Beaux-Artes Georgian hand painted Panel would look fabulous on a door.  $325 33-1/4″ W x 53″H.  The height is adjustable.  Shown with our Georgian Panel Kit.

Beaux-Artes hand painted Georgian panel art

 

Andrew Skurman

wood door

Marie Antoinette Boudoir

painted door

signature

 

 

 

 

 

Sep 222014
 

Rizzoli has just published a new book  Americans in Paris on the Ecole des Beaux Arts which was responsible for the beautiful architecture of our young country that we refer to as the Gilded Age .   This book presents a comprehensive overview of the seminal early work of a century of American architects who studied at the famous school before going on to design and build many of the nation’s most important buildings and monuments.

Book cover

“The first American to be accepted to the École, in 1846, Richard Morris Hunt (the brain behind the Statue of Liberty’s pedestal and the fabled Breakers estate in Newport, Rhode Island) led a line of students that included Guy Lowell (architect of Boston’s Museum of Fine Arts), Julia Morgan (the school’s first woman and the designer of Hearst Castle), Charles McKim (of legendary firm McKim, Mead & White, whose creations include New York’s original Penn Station and the Morgan Library), and John Russell Pope (best known for the Jefferson Memorial and the National Archives in Washington).”

George Howe Post Office rendering

Here are some of those important buildings along with a collection of mansions from the Gilded Age.

The Breakers, Newport, Rhode Island

The Breakers Exterior

The Breakers interior

breakers interior

The Breakers Dining Room

Boston Museum of Fine Art

Boston Museum of Fine Art exterior

Boston Museum of Fine Art interior

Museum of Fine Arts Boston

Museum of Fine Art interior gallery

Hearst Castle

HEarst Castle

Hearst Castle Entrance

Hearst Castle Tower

Hearst Castle

An iconic pool.

Hearst Castle Pool

Today’s icon Lady Gaga chose the Hearst Castle indoor pool for her video location.

Lady Gaga Hearst Castle Indoor Pool

Love that we have such magnificent places combining architecture, decorative arts and sculpture.

Hearst Castle Roman Indoor Pool

Hearst Castle Great Room

Morgan Library

Morgan Library Rencering

Morgan Library Exterior

Great sculpture.

Morgan Library Lions

Morgan Library

Morgan Library

Morgan Library Ceiling

Morgan Library Ceiling

Morgan Library

 

Continue reading »

 September 22, 2014  Posted by at 5:41 pm Architecture, Art, Artisan and Craftsman, Interior Design No Responses »
Aug 142014
 

Richard Hampton Jenrette  a self-proclaimed “house-aholic”, established the Classical American Homes Preservation Trust (CAHPT) and Richard Hampton Jenrette Foundation in 1994.  Mr. Jenrette has spent the last forty five years acquiring and restoring homes.  Some were sold and given away but he kept 6 of the finest.   This not-for-profit organization will eventually own, maintain and manage sharing the homes with the public. In additon to the restoration the next logical step was the collecting of period antiques to furnish the houses. Today, Mr. Jenrette owns hundreds of antiques, almost entirely American and many original to the houses.

map of the locations of the jenrette houses

1.  Ayr Mount

Ayr Mount- Exterior

“Ayr Mount is a Federal-era plantation house built in 1815 in Hillsborough, North Carolina by William Kirkland.   Kirkland, named the house in honor of his birthplace, Ayr, Scotland. Unlike the other houses in the Classical American Homes Preservation Trust collection, Ayr Mount looks deceptively simple, even austere on the outside. There are no soaring columns proclaiming its classicism. On the other hand, Ayr Mount is far grander – especially in the interior – than one might expect from a first look at the exterior. The ceiling height of 14 feet is unusual for this period as is the elaborate Federal period woodwork and plasterwork found throughout the house. Ayr Mount also was the first major residence built of brick in this area of predominantly colonial era wood frame houses. At the time of its construction at the end of the War of 1812, Ayr Mount was considered one of the finest residential structures in Piedmont, North Carolina. 

Ayr Mount - interior

Ayr Mount interior dining room

This home is currently open to the public.  Information for visiting the home and its beautiful grounds are here.  The preservation of the land surrounding Ayr Mount is an important part of Mr. Jenrette’s mission.   Ayr Mount was originally a 503-acre plantation, but today the house is surrounded by approximately 60 remaining acres of gardens, woodlands, pastures, and serene riverside lookouts. These grounds, plus the trails opposite it across the Eno River, total to over 287 acres.  There are three distinct trails that are privately maintained without governmental funding by Classical American Homes Preservation Trust.  Enjoy year round.

Gate to Ayr Mount

Ayr Mount landscape

Video on Poets Walk.  Publication available on this house,  The Kirklands of Ayr Mount chronicles the rise and fall of Kirkland’s fortunes and his descendants’ efforts to retain the family mansion for 150 years after Kirkland’s death. The book also provides a detailed picture of the small but historically important town of Hillsborough.

2.  Millford Plantation

“Millford Plantation, built in 1839-41, is considered by many to be the finest example of Greek Revival residential architecture in America. The grandeur of the house, located in such a remote section of rural South Carolina, seems to come as a surprise to first-time visitors, who must drive over miles of dirt roads and through moss-draped forests to reach the house. Suddenly the house appears out of nowhere, in all its classical glory – six massive fluted Corinthian columns, 16-foot ceilings, floor-to-ceiling windows, a domed rotunda enclosing a spectacular circular staircase – all the features to impress that are inherent in Greek Revival architecture. Surrounded by live oaks, magnolias and green lawns, Millford seems as though it might be part of a dream.”

Millford Plantation exterior

Millford Plantation interior

How did Millford survive the Civil War? It was a miracle. On what turned out to be the final day of the War before Lee’s surrender, Northern troops, under the command of Brig. General Edward Elmer Potter, arrived at Millford. Gov. Manning met the Yankee General at the front door and observed: “Well, the house was built by a Potter (Nathaniel Potter, the architect) and it looks as though it will be destroyed by a Potter.” General Potter responded: “No, you are protected. Nathaniel Potter was my brother.”

Millford plantation staircase

Although their fortune was destroyed by the Civil War, the Mannings managed to hold on to Millford until 1902 when it was sold to Mary Clark Thompson of New York, who later bequeathed it to her two Clark nephews. The Clarks owned and loved Millford for the next 90 years, enjoying it as a winter residence with ample opportunities for hunting and fishing. The Clarks sold the mansion and 400 acres to Richard Hampton Jenrette in 1992, but they still retain several thousand acres of timberland in the vicinity.  Visit Information.

Millford Plantation - gardens

3.  Roper House

Roper House, was built in 1838 on the recently completed High Battery with a commanding view of the Charleston, South Carolina harbor.  The house is an outstanding example of early 19th Century Greek Revival architecture in a city better known for its 18th Century Georgian-style architecture. Roper House is built on a monumental scale, with massive, two-story-high Ionic columns raised above a first floor, arched loggia pedestal base. Ceiling heights are 18 feet on the piano nobile, with tall windows extending to the floor. The piazza, opening off the double parlors, has the finest view in Charleston.

Roper House exterior

 It is said that Mr. Roper intended his showcase home to be the first residence seen by visitors approaching Charleston from the sea.

Roper House water view

The architect of this imposing house is undocumented, but some architectural historians have attributed its design to Karl Friedrich Reichert, a highly regarded German who was working in Charleston at the time on the new Charleston Hotel.

roper house-interior

roper house furnishing

 

Richard H. Jenrette’s new book about the Roper House is now available for orderColumns by the Sea: The Roper House takes a closer look at this National Landmark and National Registered Historic Place with full-page images of the house and its collection.

Continue reading »

 August 14, 2014  Posted by at 2:55 pm Architecture, Interior Design, It's A Classic No Responses »